Rationales for food refusal in Chinese patients with anorexia nervosa

Citation
S. Lee et al., Rationales for food refusal in Chinese patients with anorexia nervosa, INT J EAT D, 29(2), 2001, pp. 224-229
Citations number
18
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Psycology,"Clinical Psycology & Psychiatry
Journal title
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS
ISSN journal
0276-3478 → ACNP
Volume
29
Issue
2
Year of publication
2001
Pages
224 - 229
Database
ISI
SICI code
0276-3478(200103)29:2<224:RFFRIC>2.0.ZU;2-N
Abstract
Objective. To study the rationales for food refusal among Chinese patients with typical and atypical anorexia nervosa. Method: forty-eight consecutive patients with broadly defined anorexia nervosa underwent evaluation with a self-report rationale for food refusal questionnaire, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), the 21-item Beck Depression inventory (BDI-2 1), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and other clinical assessm ents. Results: Fat-phobic patients (N = 32) had a significantly higher prem orbid body mass index than non-fat-phobic patients (N = 16), but they did n ot differ on other clinical parameters, GHQ- 12, BDI-21, and HDRS scores. A t clinical presentation, 3 months, and I year prior to presentation, fat ph obia and stomach bloating were the most common rationales for food refusal among fat-phobic and non-far-phobic patients, respectively A total of 37% o f fat-phobic patients endorsed non-fat-phobic rationales at the rime of cli nical presentation, whereas non-fat-phobic patients adhered to non-fat-phob ic attributions more consistently. Discussion: The rationales used by anore xic patients to explain noneating are more varied than implied in the 4th e d, of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the ICD -10 Classification of Mental and Behavior Disorders: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. A broadened conceptualization of anorexia nervos a may enhance an understanding of patients' illness experiences and enliven research on eating disorders. (C) 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.