Physician intervention and patient risk perception among smokers with acute respiratory illness in the emergency department

Citation
Bc. Bock et al., Physician intervention and patient risk perception among smokers with acute respiratory illness in the emergency department, PREV MED, 32(2), 2001, pp. 175-181
Citations number
26
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Envirnomentale Medicine & Public Health
Journal title
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
ISSN journal
0091-7435 → ACNP
Volume
32
Issue
2
Year of publication
2001
Pages
175 - 181
Database
ISI
SICI code
0091-7435(200102)32:2<175:PIAPRP>2.0.ZU;2-U
Abstract
Background. Acute Respiratory Illness accounts for over 12 million visits t o emergency departments in the United States each year. Between one-fourth and one-half of these patients are smokers. We examined the frequency of ph ysician intervention for smoking cessation among acute respiratory illness patients in the emergency department, and examined the influence of physici an intervention on patients' perceived risk from smoking and motivation to quit. Methods. This study was conducted in the emergency department of a large in ner-city hospital. Adult smokers (n = 63) presenting with symptoms of acute respiratory illness were surveyed by exit interview while in the emergency department. The frequency and extent of physician interventions for smokin g were examined using the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidel ines as a model. We also assessed patients' perceptions of risk from smokin g, the presence of other household smokers, and the patients' motivation to quit. Results. Emergency department physicians provided incomplete and inconsiste nt intervention for smoking. While most patients reported being asked if th ey smoked, only half of smokers were advised to quit. Only 9% were offered any assistance with quitting. Risk perception was generally low, however, t he majority of smokers were willing to receive on-site smoking cessation co unseling while in the emergency department. Conclusions. The small sample size in this study requires that results be i nterpreted with caution. However, the findings of this study suggest that t he emergency department setting may provide a unique "teachable moment" in which to initiate smoking cessation counseling for this high-risk populatio n. (C) 2001 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.