Judging not only by color: Ethnicity, nativity, and neighborhood attainment

Citation
Mj. White et S. Sassler, Judging not only by color: Ethnicity, nativity, and neighborhood attainment, SOC SCI Q, 81(4), 2000, pp. 997-1013
Citations number
43
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY
ISSN journal
0038-4941 → ACNP
Volume
81
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
997 - 1013
Database
ISI
SICI code
0038-4941(200012)81:4<997:JNOBCE>2.0.ZU;2-K
Abstract
Objective. We examine hypotheses derived from theories of structural assimi lation and spatial mobility to study the residential attainment of white et hnics, blacks, Asians, and Hispanics in the United States. We examine how i mmigrant status, ethnicity, and individual and family characteristics predi ct socioeconomic neighborhood outcome. Methods. We extend previous studies in several ways. First, we develop the concept and measurement of residenti al attainment as a neighborhood or tract-based outcome, and we examine this in a regression-based framework. Second, we expand ethnicity to twenty-eig ht distinct groups. Third, we measure directly the impact of intermarriage on residential outcomes. Results. Our empirical findings show that immigran t status and ethnicity, often implicated but not always kept conceptually d istinct in discussions of assimilation, exert different effects across ethn ic groups. We find that intermarriage does matter, as minority group househ olders with Angle spouses gain access to higher-status neighborhoods, net o f their personal socioeconomic status. Finally and notably, ethnic groups d iffer in the returns to personal socioeconomic traits in this process of ne ighborhood attainment. Conclusions. Ethnic background dominates immigrant s tatus in predicting residential outcomes. Furthermore, the process of assim ilation varies noticeably within ethnic groups.