Difference and competition: the imitation and reproduction of fine art in a nineteenth-century illustrated weekly news magazine (Le Monde Illustre)

Authors
Citation
T. Gretton, Difference and competition: the imitation and reproduction of fine art in a nineteenth-century illustrated weekly news magazine (Le Monde Illustre), OX ART J, 23(2), 2000, pp. 143-162
Citations number
11
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Arts & Architecture
Journal title
OXFORD ART JOURNAL
ISSN journal
0142-6540 → ACNP
Volume
23
Issue
2
Year of publication
2000
Pages
143 - 162
Database
ISI
SICI code
0142-6540(2000)23:2<143:DACTIA>2.0.ZU;2-K
Abstract
General interest weekly illustrated periodicals dominated the production of informational imagery in the developed world in the second half of the 19t h century. Until the middle of the 1890s they could not reliably produce pr inting surfaces directly from photographs, so their domination was achieved through the 'industrialisation' of hand-made pictures. In the circumstance s, a crossover between the ambitions and values articulated in the field of high art and those deployed in such periodicals was inevitable, and the re sultant strains on established hierarchies were considerable. The article d iscusses hierarchy and difference in visual culture with a focus on one iss ue of Le Monde illustre from 1880. It uses this issue as an example of the ways in which, particularly in the years from 1860 to 1890, such publicatio ns exploited the cultural prestige and power of the visual arts for their o wn ends, and marked both their difference from and their convergence with t he world of fine art, its values, subject matters, and signifying technique s. The paper concludes by suggesting that we must interpret key evolutions in easel painting in this period as strategies and tactics for coping with the competitive challenge posed by magazine illustration.