Minimal residual disease at the time of peripheral blood stem cell harvestin patients with advanced neuroblastoma

Citation
Sa. Burchill et al., Minimal residual disease at the time of peripheral blood stem cell harvestin patients with advanced neuroblastoma, MED PED ONC, 36(1), 2001, pp. 213-219
Citations number
34
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Pediatrics
Journal title
MEDICAL AND PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY
ISSN journal
0098-1532 → ACNP
Volume
36
Issue
1
Year of publication
2001
Pages
213 - 219
Database
ISI
SICI code
0098-1532(200101)36:1<213:MRDATT>2.0.ZU;2-F
Abstract
Background. Despite treatment with high-dose myeloblative chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) rescue, a high proportion of children wit h neuroblastoma relapse and die. Re-infusion of PBSC contaminated with tumo ur at the time of autologous transplantation may play a significant role in this relapse. In this study the frequency of tumour contamination in PB fr om children with neuroblastoma has been investigated. Procedure. Minimal re sidual disease was measured using RT-PCR for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA in PBSCs from patients with advanced neuroblastoma. PBSCs from 18 patients in complete clinical remission were studied. Results. Studies in other can cers have suggested minimal contamination of PBSCs with tumour cells; TH mR NA was detected by RT-PCR in 50% (9/18) of PBSC harvests. Seventy-seven per cent (7/9) of patients with TH mRNA in PBSC died of disease compared to 44% (4/9) who were TH mRNA-negative. Conclusions. Therefore, the presence of T H mRNA in PBSCs appeared to be associated with an unfavourable outcome, alt hough this was not statistically significant. In summary, RT-PCR for TH mRN A is a sensitive method for the identification of tumour cells in PBSC harv est. The presence of TH mRNA in PBSC harvest may reflect disease status and be associated with an unfavourable outcome, although long-term clinical ou tcome studies in a larger patient cohort are required. Med. Pediatr. Oncol. 36:213-219, 2001. (C) 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.