Report or the Health Care Delivery Work Group - Behavioral research related to the establishment of a chronic disease model for diabetes care

Citation
Re. Glasgow et al., Report or the Health Care Delivery Work Group - Behavioral research related to the establishment of a chronic disease model for diabetes care, DIABET CARE, 24(1), 2001, pp. 124-130
Citations number
97
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Endocrynology, Metabolism & Nutrition","Endocrinology, Nutrition & Metabolism
Journal title
DIABETES CARE
ISSN journal
0149-5992 → ACNP
Volume
24
Issue
1
Year of publication
2001
Pages
124 - 130
Database
ISI
SICI code
0149-5992(200101)24:1<124:ROTHCD>2.0.ZU;2-E
Abstract
As one of four work groups for the November 1999 conference on Behavioral S cience Research in Diabetes, sponsored by the National Institute on Diabete s and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the health care delivery work group ev aluated the status of research on quality of care, patient-provider interac tions, and health care systems' innovations related to improved diabetes ou tcomes. In addition, we made recommendations for future research. In this a rticle, which was developed and modified at the November conference by expe rts in health care delivery, diabetes and behavioral science, we summarize the literature on patient-provider interactions, diabetes care and self-man agement support among underserved and minority populations, and implementat ion of chronic care management systems for diabetes. We conclude that, alth ough the quality of care provided to the vast majority of diabetic patients is problematic, this is principally not the fault of either individual pat ients or health care professionals. Rather, it is a systems issue emanating from the acute illness model of care, which still predominates. Examples o f proactive population-based chronic care management programs incorporating behavioral principles are discussed. The article concludes by identifying barriers to the establishment of a chronic care model (e.g., lack of suppor tive policies, understanding of population-based management, and informatio n systems) and priorities for future research in this area needed to overco me these barriers.