Patient recall versus physician documentation in report of smoking cessation counselling performed in the inpatient setting

Citation
Jm. Nicholson et al., Patient recall versus physician documentation in report of smoking cessation counselling performed in the inpatient setting, TOB CONTROL, 9(4), 2000, pp. 382-388
Citations number
27
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science","Envirnomentale Medicine & Public Health
Journal title
TOBACCO CONTROL
ISSN journal
0964-4563 → ACNP
Volume
9
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
382 - 388
Database
ISI
SICI code
0964-4563(200012)9:4<382:PRVPDI>2.0.ZU;2-3
Abstract
Objectives-To determine rates of patient reported and physician documented counselling; to identify predictors of each report; and to identify the imp act of each report on smoking cessation attempts after discharge from the h ospital. Design-Stickers on subjects' charts prompted physicians to give brief smoki ng cessation counselling to patients in the hospital. Patients reported cou nselling received and quit attempts in a phone interview conducted 7-18 day s after discharge. Rates of counselling and correlations were calculated, a nd multivariate analysis identified predictors of patient report, physician documentation, and quit attempts. Setting-Four hospitals in the Minneapolis/St Paul metropolitan area. Subjects-682 hospital patients who had smoked more than 100 cigarettes in t heir lifetime and had smoked in the last three months. Results-71.0% of patients reported counselling, and physicians documented c ounselling in the charts of 46.2% of patients (correlation = 0.15, kappa = 0.13). Patient report was predicted by specific hospital, belief that their hospitalisation was smoking related, diagnosis of a smoking related diseas e, and physician documentation of counselling. Physician documentation was predicted by female patient, specific hospital, longer hospital stay, and m arginally predicted by smoking related disease. Quit attempts were predicte d by patient report of counselling, but not physician documentation. Conclusions-Physicians document counselling in the hospital at a lower rate than patients report it, and the correlation between reports is very low, making an accurate assessment of true rates of counselling difficult. While it is important to increase physician documentation, it is even more impor tant to increase patient recall, as this is the only report that predicts a quit attempt.