Carbon use for synthetic materials in Germany - current situation and saving potentials for energy and CO2

Citation
M. Patel et al., Carbon use for synthetic materials in Germany - current situation and saving potentials for energy and CO2, RESOUR CON, 31(1), 2000, pp. 9-50
Citations number
58
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology,"Environmental Engineering & Energy
Journal title
RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING
ISSN journal
0921-3449 → ACNP
Volume
31
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Pages
9 - 50
Database
ISI
SICI code
0921-3449(200012)31:1<9:CUFSMI>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Abstract
This study deals with the use of fossil carbon (oil, natural gas, coal) to manufacture materials ('products of non-energy use') and with the potential to reduce the inputs of fossil resources and the emissions of fossil CO2 i n Germany. An overview of the material flows is given for Germany in 1995. Recycled and re-used products still accounted for less than 10% of the end products consumed domestically. The energy requirements and CO2 emissions f rom the production and waste management processes related to non-energy use have been calculated: it is estimated that approximately 1700 PJ of finite primary energy are consumed and 57 Mt of fossil CO2 emissions are released (1995). Compared with the total German industry (without non-energy use) t his represents 44% of the energy use and 20% of the fossil CO2 emissions. D etailed analyses are performed in order to determine the extent to which th e energy consumed by and the CO2 emissions released from this system could be reduced. This is done by estimating the possible effects of (a) using wa ste as a resource, and (b) using biomass as a feedstock. In the first group recycling, re-use and enhanced energy recovery are investigated for plasti cs, discarded tyres, technical rubber products, asphalt, industrial bitumen and waste lubricants. The second group, i.e. the analysed bio-based materi als, comprises of oleochemical surfactants, lubricants from vegetable oils, starch polymers and selected bulk chemicals. The total potential savings r elated to waste use and biomass use (see above (a) and (b)) are estimated a t 220 PJ of gross finite energy and 14 Mt of gross fossil CO2. This is the equivalent of a 13% saving in energy and a 24% reduction in CO2 emissions. Hence, the saving potential identified on the non-energy side is comparable with the saving potential discussed and negotiated for CO, mitigation thro ugh energy efficiency improvements. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All righ ts reserved.