Aspiration in transtracheal oxygen insufflation with different insufflation flow rates during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs

Citation
B. Jawan et al., Aspiration in transtracheal oxygen insufflation with different insufflation flow rates during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs, ANESTH ANAL, 91(6), 2000, pp. 1431-1435
Citations number
24
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Aneshtesia & Intensive Care","Medical Research Diagnosis & Treatment
Journal title
ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA
ISSN journal
0003-2999 → ACNP
Volume
91
Issue
6
Year of publication
2000
Pages
1431 - 1435
Database
ISI
SICI code
0003-2999(200012)91:6<1431:AITOIW>2.0.ZU;2-S
Abstract
We investigated whether transtracheal insufflation of oxygen with different insufflation flow rates protects against aspiration of gastric contents du ring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Its ventilation and oxygenation e ffects were also evaluated. Cardiac arrest was induced in anesthetized and paralyzed 18 mongrel dogs. Chest compression using an automatic thumper was performed while the dogs randomly received no mechanical ventilation (Grou p I, n = 6) or were transtracheally insufflated with 4 L/min oxygen (Group II, n = 6) or 10 L/min oxygen (Croup III, n = 6). Blood samples were drawn every 5 min for 20 min for blood gas analysis, the mouths of the dogs were then filled with 70 mt mixed barium, and 10 min after chest compression, ch est radiographs were taken to evaluate the incidence of pulmonary aspiratio n. Results showed that pulmonary aspiration occurred in all dogs of Group I and three of the six dogs in Group II, whereas dogs in Group III were free from pulmonary aspiration. Both transtracheal oxygen insufflation groups m aintained oxygen saturation significantly better than Group I,but mild hype rcapnia was observed in all groups after 20 min of CPR. We conclude that tr anstracheal oxygen insufflation, but not chest compression alone, was able to maintain oxygenation for 20 min during CPR in dogs with cardiac arrest. Mild hypercapnia was noted in all groups. Chest compression alone caused pu lmonary aspiration, whereas insufflation of 10 L O-2/min provided better pr otection against pulmonary aspiration than that of 4 L O-2/min.