Infanticide and cannibalism by male chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda

Citation
Dp. Watts et Jc. Mitani, Infanticide and cannibalism by male chimpanzees at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda, PRIMATES, 41(4), 2000, pp. 357-365
Citations number
47
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Animal Sciences
Journal title
PRIMATES
ISSN journal
0032-8332 → ACNP
Volume
41
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
357 - 365
Database
ISI
SICI code
0032-8332(200010)41:4<357:IACBMC>2.0.ZU;2-7
Abstract
Researchers have documented infanticide by adult males in four wild chimpan zee populations. Males in three of these have killed infants from outside o f their own communities, but most infanticides, including one from Kanyawar a, in Kibale National Park, Uganda, took place within communities. Here we report two new cases of infanticide by male chimpanzees at a second Kibale site, Ngogo, where the recently habituated chimpanzee community is the larg est yet known. Both infanticides happened during boundary patrols, which oc cur at a high frequency there. Patrolling males attacked solitary females w ho were unable to defend their infants successfully. The victims were almos t certainly not members of the Ngogo community. Males cannibalized both inf ants and completely consumed their carcasses. These observations show that infanticide by males is widespread in the Kibale population and that betwee n-community infanticide also happens there. We discuss our observations in the context of the sexual selection hypothesis and other proposed explanati ons for infanticide by male chimpanzees. The observations support the argum ents that infanticide has been an important selective force in chimpanzee s ocial evolution and that females with dependent infants can be at great ris k near range boundaries, but why male chimpanzees kill infants is still unc ertain.