Cigarette smoking and risk for hearing impairment: A longitudinal study inJapanese male office workers

Citation
N. Nakanishi et al., Cigarette smoking and risk for hearing impairment: A longitudinal study inJapanese male office workers, J OCCUP ENV, 42(11), 2000, pp. 1045-1049
Citations number
17
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Envirnomentale Medicine & Public Health
Journal title
JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE
ISSN journal
1076-2752 → ACNP
Volume
42
Issue
11
Year of publication
2000
Pages
1045 - 1049
Database
ISI
SICI code
1076-2752(200011)42:11<1045:CSARFH>2.0.ZU;2-6
Abstract
The association of cigarette smoking with development of hearing impairment (loss of 30 dB at 1000 Hz and 40 dB at 4000 Hz) over a 5-year follow-up wa s studied in 1554 non-hearing-impaired Japanese male office workers who ran ged in age from 30 to 59 years. After controlling-for potential predictors of hearing impairment, the relative risk for low-frequency hearing impairme nt compared with never smokers was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57 to 2.17) for ever-smokers, 1.21 (95% CI, 0.65 to 2.25) for current smokers of 1 to 20 cigarettes/day, 1.35 (95% CI, 0.70 to 2.61)for current smokers o f 21 to 30 cigarettes/day, and 1.82 (95% CI, 0.98 to 3.38) for current smok ers of 31 or more cigarettes/day (P for trend = 0.063). The respective mult ivariate-adjusted relative risks for high-frequency hearing impairment comp ared with never smelters were 1.70 (95% CI, 0.85 to 3.40), 1.82 (95% CI, 0. 92 to 3.59), 2.00 (95% Cl, 0.98 to 4.08), and 2.20 (95% CI, 1.09 to 4.42) ( P for trend = 0.025). As the number of pack-years of exposure increased, th e risk for high-frequency hearing impairment increased in a dose-dependent manner (P for trend = 0.011), but the risk for low-frequency hearing impair ment did not (P for trend = 0.172). Our results indicate that cigarette smo king is highly associated with development of high-frequency hearing impair ment in Japanese male office workers.