Emotional reactions to conflict: Do dependence and legitimacy matter?

Citation
C. Johnson et al., Emotional reactions to conflict: Do dependence and legitimacy matter?, SOCIAL FORC, 79(1), 2000, pp. 107-137
Citations number
60
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
SOCIAL FORCES
ISSN journal
0037-7732 → ACNP
Volume
79
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Pages
107 - 137
Database
ISI
SICI code
0037-7732(200009)79:1<107:ERTCDD>2.0.ZU;2-I
Abstract
Based on the dependence, legitimacy, and justice literatures, lye develop p redictions about how two forms of power affect subordinates' anticipated em otional reactions to an inappropriate act by a superior and the likelihood that they will express these emotions toward their superior We test the eff ects of dependence and legitimacy on the anticipated experience of three ba ckward-looking emotions (satisfaction, anger, and resentment) and two forwa rd-looking emotions (excitement and worry). Using vignettes, we asked 330 c ollege students to take the position of a subordinate in a conflict with a manager and describe how they feel and how likely they would be to express their emotions toward their manager. The design manipulated subordinates' a nd superiors' alternatives as well as endorsement and authorization of the superior. Results show that subordinates report the highest levels of anger and resentment when they are in the least dependent position and the lowes t levels when they are in a highly and equally dependent relationship with their superior. They also report more resentment when their superior is not endorsed. Less dependent subordinates feel more excitement and less worry than highly dependent subordinates. They also feel more excitement when the ir superior is not endorsed Finally, subordinates in a highly dependent pos ition or with a highly endorsed superior are less likely to report the like lihood of expressing negative emotions toward their superior.