Can noninvasive imaging accurately depict intracranial aneurysms? A systematic review

Citation
Pm. White et al., Can noninvasive imaging accurately depict intracranial aneurysms? A systematic review, RADIOLOGY, 217(2), 2000, pp. 361-370
Citations number
57
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Radiology ,Nuclear Medicine & Imaging","Medical Research Diagnosis & Treatment
Journal title
RADIOLOGY
ISSN journal
0033-8419 → ACNP
Volume
217
Issue
2
Year of publication
2000
Pages
361 - 370
Database
ISI
SICI code
0033-8419(200011)217:2<361:CNIADI>2.0.ZU;2-O
Abstract
PURPOSE: To perform a systematic review to determine the accuracy of comput ed tomographic (CT) angiography, magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, and t ranscranial Doppler ultrasonography (US) in depicting intracranial aneurysm s. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 1988-1998 literature search for studies with 10 or more subjects in which noninvasive imaging was compared with angiography w as undertaken. Studies meeting initial criteria were evaluated by using int rinsically weighted standardized assessment to determine suitability for in clusion. Studies scoring greater than 50% were included. RESULTS: Of 103 studies that met initial criteria, 38 scored greater than 5 0%. CT angiography and MR angiography had accuracies per aneurysm of 89% (9 5% CI: 87%, 91%) and 90% (95% CI: 87%, 92%), respectively. For US, data wer e scanty and accuracy was lower, although the Cls overlapped those of CT an giography and MR angiography. Sensitivity was greater for detection of-aneu rysms larger than 3 mm than for detection of aneurysms 3 mm or smaller-for CT angiography, 96% (95% CI: 94%, 98%) versus 61% (95% CI: 51%, 70%), and f or MR angiography, 94% (95% CI: 90%, 97%) versus 38% (95% CI: 25%, 53%). Di agnostic accuracy was similar for anterior and posterior circulation aneury sms. CONCLUSION: CT angiography and MR angiography depicted aneurysms with an ac curacy of about 90%. Most studies were performed in populations with high a neurysm prevalence, which may have introduced bias toward noninvasive exami nations.