The demographics of resprouting in tree and shrub species of a moist tropical forest

Citation
Cj. Paciorek et al., The demographics of resprouting in tree and shrub species of a moist tropical forest, J ECOLOGY, 88(5), 2000, pp. 765-777
Citations number
50
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0022-0477 → ACNP
Volume
88
Issue
5
Year of publication
2000
Pages
765 - 777
Database
ISI
SICI code
0022-0477(200010)88:5<765:TDORIT>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
1 Individuals of many woody plant species have the ability to respond to da mage which causes removal of the crown by producing new branches (sprouts) along the remaining stem. Resprouting by woody plants has received little a ttention in relatively undisturbed tropical forest. 2 To assess the importance of resprouting for forest dynamics, we estimated resprouting rates and mortality rates of resprouted individuals for the fo rest as a whole and for individual species in a 50-ha permanent plot in tro pical moist forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. We tested for differen ces between species and asked whether the differences were related to phylo geny, growth form or shade tolerance. 3 Among individuals not known to have resprouted previously, we estimate th at the annual rate of resprouting is 1.7% for individuals in both small and large size classes (1-9.9 cm d.b.h. and greater than or equal to 10 cm d.b .h.). For small and large individuals, respectively, annual mortality of pr eviously undamaged individuals is 2.2% and 1.5%, while that of resprouted i ndividuals is 9.6% and 10.3%. This resulted in survival of 62% of resproute d individuals over 5 years, compared to 90% survival among individuals not known to have resprouted recently. 4 Resprouting rates varied by species and family, but little between growth forms. Species in the families Lauraceae and Piperaceae had high rates of resprouting. Resprouting was common across the spectrum of shade tolerance. 5 Damage to woody forest plants on Barro Colorado Island is frequent, and m any species are able to respond by resprouting. Resprouting ability may be an important life history characteristic of woody species on BCI, with indi viduals experiencing both increases and decreases in size.