Land is thicker than blood: Revisiting "kinship paternalism" in a peasant village in South Korea

Authors
Citation
Sh. Choi, Land is thicker than blood: Revisiting "kinship paternalism" in a peasant village in South Korea, J ANTHR RES, 56(3), 2000, pp. 349-363
Citations number
52
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL RESEARCH
ISSN journal
0091-7710 → ACNP
Volume
56
Issue
3
Year of publication
2000
Pages
349 - 363
Database
ISI
SICI code
0091-7710(200023)56:3<349:LITTBR>2.0.ZU;2-B
Abstract
Kinship reciprocity does not necessarily inhibit the development of class r esentment between poor and wealthy kin. The data collected from a peasant v illage in North Cholla province in Korea demonstrate how the frantic pace o f capitalistic development since the late 1960s has changed the economic fo undation of kinship. On the one hand, favorable economic changes have enabl ed some poor peasants to liberate themselves from the yoke of unequal relat ionships symbolically disguised as "kinship paternalism." These peasants ha ve ingeniously adapted to macroeconomic changes to become independent. On t he other hand, massive rural migration to the cities created a setting wher ein wealthy kin fostered young poor kin who were raised to be effective lab orers. As the fostered kin's social space was completely monitored by the w ealthy foster kin, the former could not utilize changing economic condition s to their advantage. the dramatic agrarian transformation has provided an opportunity to see the true nature of hegemonic and antihegemonic relations hips between kin.