Political culture in Canada and the United States: Comparing social trust,self-esteem, and political liberalism in major Canadian and American cities

Citation
Cd. Moon et al., Political culture in Canada and the United States: Comparing social trust,self-esteem, and political liberalism in major Canadian and American cities, SOC SCI Q, 81(3), 2000, pp. 826-836
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY
ISSN journal
0038-4941 → ACNP
Volume
81
Issue
3
Year of publication
2000
Pages
826 - 836
Database
ISI
SICI code
0038-4941(200009)81:3<826:PCICAT>2.0.ZU;2-B
Abstract
Objective. This study investigates the proposition that residents of the ci ties of Canada and the United States differ in their political cultures. Me thods. The analysis employs aggregated individual-level data on social trus t, self-esteem, and liberalism provided to the authors after being aggregat ed at the city level and in subgroups of the population in each city (seven in Canada, forty-seven in the U.S.). Results. There are significant differ ences in the levels of social trust expressed by the citizens of the cities of the two countries, with Canadians expressing the greater trust, but no significant differences on self-esteem and liberalism. When clustering citi es using all three values, five of the Canadian cities group in a single cl uster shared with no U.S. cities. Generational effects emerge in the cross- national comparison of self-esteem and liberalism. Conclusions. On the basi s of these city-level aggregated individual data, there remain significant differences between the cultures of Canada and the United States. Moreover, little evidence suggests that the cultures of the two countries will becom e closer as the result of generational replacement.