Racial residential segregation by level of socioeconomic status

Citation
C. St John et R. Clymer, Racial residential segregation by level of socioeconomic status, SOC SCI Q, 81(3), 2000, pp. 701-715
Citations number
25
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
SOCIAL SCIENCE QUARTERLY
ISSN journal
0038-4941 → ACNP
Volume
81
Issue
3
Year of publication
2000
Pages
701 - 715
Database
ISI
SICI code
0038-4941(200009)81:3<701:RRSBLO>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
Objective. Most research examining black/white segregation by level of soci oeconomic status (SES) has used the index of dissimilarity (D) and has foun d that segregation is uniformly high across levels of SES. D is based on ev enness, one of several dimensions of segregation. We propose that exposure- based measures (P*) might contribute additional information about segregati on by level of SES. Methods. We calculate D and variations of P* for blacks and whites by level of education for metropolitan areas with over 40,000 b lacks in 1990. Results. D shows that black/white segregation is nearly as h igh for those with high levels of education as for those with low levels; b ut P* shows that blacks with high levels of education have more exposure to similarly educated whites and to whites in general than do blacks with low levels of education. Conclusion. Even though blacks of all levels of SES d on't live in the neighborhoods where most whites of same SES live, high SES blacks have more opportunity for interaction in their own neighborhoods wi th high SES whites than low SES blacks have in their neighborhoods with low SES whites.