The healthy human infant tends to sleep in the prone rather than the supine position

Citation
H. Togari et al., The healthy human infant tends to sleep in the prone rather than the supine position, EAR HUM DEV, 59(3), 2000, pp. 151-158
Citations number
11
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Pediatrics
Journal title
EARLY HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
ISSN journal
0378-3782 → ACNP
Volume
59
Issue
3
Year of publication
2000
Pages
151 - 158
Database
ISI
SICI code
0378-3782(200009)59:3<151:THHITT>2.0.ZU;2-D
Abstract
There are few reports about developmental behavior relating tc, roll over a mong healthy infants. We assessed the relationship between the placed posit ion on sleeping and altered sleeping position the next morning by roll over among healthy infants. A health check-up clinic distributed a total of 162 6 questionnaires to parents whose infant's ages are 1.5 years (or 18 months ) old. The age at the first roll over and the change in sleeping position t he next morning after they started to roll over, were investigated. The mea n age of roll over from the supine to the prone among infants who were plac ed mainly in the prone sleeping position, at least in the first week of lif e, was 4.0 months (S.D., 1.1). The mean age of roll over from the supine to the prone among infants who were placed mainly in the supine sleeping posi tion during early neonatal life and thereafter was 4.4 months (S.D., 1.2). The age of the first roll over from supine to prone was significantly young er in infants who were placed mainly in the prone sleeping position during early neonatal life. Among 651 infants who had been placed supine, 34.7% we re found prone by roll over the next morning. Among 211 infants who had bee n placed prone, 14.2% were found supine by roll over the next morning. The number of infants who rolled over from supine to prone position was statist ically greater than those from prone to supine. It is likely that the healt hy human infant tends to sleep in the prone rather than the supine position . The finding is especially important for the correct assessment of the pos ition in which SIDS cases were found dead. (C) 2000 Published by Elsevier S cience Ireland Ltd.