Strategies to reduce the risk of virus-related cancers

Authors
Citation
S. Franceschi, Strategies to reduce the risk of virus-related cancers, ANN ONCOL, 11(9), 2000, pp. 1091-1096
Citations number
43
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Oncology,"Onconogenesis & Cancer Research
Journal title
ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY
ISSN journal
0923-7534 → ACNP
Volume
11
Issue
9
Year of publication
2000
Pages
1091 - 1096
Database
ISI
SICI code
0923-7534(200009)11:9<1091:STRTRO>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
Background: Experimental and epidemiological evidence has established an as sociation between at least eight viruses and various cancer sites. Recent e stimates (at least 10% of cancer worldwide) have revealed that viruses, tog ether with tobacco and diet, account for the largest proportion of cancer i n the world. Results: Improvements in the detection of viruses and biomarkers of chronic infection have led to the identification of strong associations with cance r, particularly for human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), an d human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). For some cancer viruses (e.g., HIV an d hepatitis C virus, HCV), the spectrum of malignancies involved has still to be well defined. For HBV and HPV, vaccination aimed at cancer prevention is already a reality or a possibility. Whereas HBV vaccination already eme rged as one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce adult cancer mortalit y, for HPV vaccination some technical problems still await a solution. For other infectious agents (e.g., HCV, HIV) prospects for a vaccine are not im mediate. Conclusions: In order to apply new knowledge on viruses to cancer preventio n, large vaccination trials are warranted. These will have to be large (man y thousands of people), prolonged (5-10 years), and match scientific excell ence with a feasible design. Mistrust between scientists and the public wil l have to be prevented by means of absolute openness in scientific informat ion and economical interests involved.