The contexts of adherence for African Americans with high blood pressure

Citation
Le. Rose et al., The contexts of adherence for African Americans with high blood pressure, J ADV NURS, 32(3), 2000, pp. 587-594
Citations number
27
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science
Journal title
JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING
ISSN journal
0309-2402 → ACNP
Volume
32
Issue
3
Year of publication
2000
Pages
587 - 594
Database
ISI
SICI code
0309-2402(200009)32:3<587:TCOAFA>2.0.ZU;2-X
Abstract
African American men between the ages of 18 and 49 years have the lowest ra tes of awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure (HBP) of all age/race/gender groups in the United States. A qualitative study was done to gain an understanding of urban black males' experiences of living with H BP. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 black males. The interviews explored perceptions of health, health problems and priorit ies, and concerns of daily living that influenced appointment keeping and m edication taking. The sample was a subset of 309 men participating in a 3-y ear clinical trial to improve HBP control in an inner city African-American population. Content analysis of transcribed interviews identified the foll owing themes and related concerns: (a) personal contexts: meaning of health , high blood pressure and treatments; (b) social context: living as a young black male in an urban environment; and (c) cultural context of relating: patient-provider relationship can make a difference. Influencing participan ts' responses were: interpreting symptoms; adjusting medication taking; pro tecting personal privacy; allocating limited resources; dealing with addict ion; and feeling cared for by a health care provider. Adherence appeared to be multifaceted and changing depending upon: the men's social, economic an d personal circumstances; empathetic and non-judgemental assistance from pr oviders; financial concerns and employment; and drug addiction. Findings ar e useful in refining high blood pressure interventions.