Randomised controlled trial of an educational strategy to increase school-based adolescent hepatitis B vaccination

Citation
Sr. Skinner et al., Randomised controlled trial of an educational strategy to increase school-based adolescent hepatitis B vaccination, AUS NZ J PU, 24(3), 2000, pp. 298-304
Citations number
20
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science
Journal title
AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
ISSN journal
1326-0200 → ACNP
Volume
24
Issue
3
Year of publication
2000
Pages
298 - 304
Database
ISI
SICI code
1326-0200(200006)24:3<298:RCTOAE>2.0.ZU;2-6
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate a specifically designed hepatitis B education/promotion curriculum package as part of a successful hepatitis B vaccination delivery system to adolescents. METHODS: A randomised-controlled trial was used to evaluate the effect of t he curriculum package (or intervention) on uptake of vaccine. Schools were randomly selected from the metropolitan region of Melbourne to intervention (66 schools or 7,588 students) or control groups (69 schools or 9,823 stud ents). Class teachers administered the intervention to students over 4 clas s periods before the vaccination course. RESULTS: The difference in mean school uptake between intervention and cont rol was small at 1-2% per dose. 95% confidence intervals around the differe nces were -5% to 2% per dose and not significant. Intervention schools taug ht an average of 7 items out of 12 from the curriculum package. Immunisatio n rates increased by 4-10% per dose between low and high implementation sch ools, but this trend was not significant. Impact evaluation demonstrated si gnificantly greater knowledge of hepatitis B and vaccination among students in the intervention than the control group. CONCLUSION: Hepatitis B vaccination of preadolescents was not increased by the implementation of a curriculum package that successfully increased know ledge and awareness of hepatitis B in a school-based vaccination program. A dditional strategies directed at the education of parents, the cooperative role of schools and pro-active providers might also be required to maximise vaccine uptake in this age group.