Plasma total homocysteine and retinal vascular disease

Citation
Sc. Martin et al., Plasma total homocysteine and retinal vascular disease, EYE, 14, 2000, pp. 590-593
Citations number
17
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Optalmology
Journal title
EYE
ISSN journal
0950-222X → ACNP
Volume
14
Year of publication
2000
Part
4
Pages
590 - 593
Database
ISI
SICI code
0950-222X(200008)14:<590:PTHARV>2.0.ZU;2-1
Abstract
Purpose Hyperhomocysteinaemia has been linked to macrovascular disease. Our aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between fasting pla sma total homocysteine levels and retinal vascular disease. Methods We measured the homocysteine levels in 70 patients with arterial or venous retinal vessel occlusion and compared them with the levels in 85 co ntrols without evidence of ischaemic heart disease. Homocysteine levels wer e determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection and compared after logarithmic transformation. Results Homocysteine levels were found by univariate analysis (unpaired two -tailed t-test) to be significantly higher in the group with retinal artery occlusion than the group with retinal vein occlusion (p = 0.045) and in bo th groups compared with controls (18.4 and 13.8 vs 9.5 mu mol/l; p = 0.0002 and < 0.0001, respectively). The controls, however, were significantly you nger than the subjects (51.5 +/- 15.4 vs 66.2 +/- 11.9 years; p < 0.0001), but analysis of the results by age revealed significant differences between the groups and controls for the seventh decade (vein occlusions, p = 0.05) and for the eighth decade (artery occlusions, p = 0.037). Subgroup analysi s of the retinal vessel occlusion group revealed significant differences in mean blood pressure between those with branch retinal vein occlusions (175 /100 mmHg) and both those with central retinal vein occlusions (155/88 mmHg ) and those with retinal artery occlusions (157/86 mmHg). Both vein occlusi on subgroups also differed significantly with regard to homocysteine levels , branch < central (12.2 +/- 1.3 vs 15.0 +/- 1.6 mu mol/l, p = 0.03). Multi ple linear regression analysis revealed significant relationships between h omocysteine levels and the presence of retinal vessel occlusion (p = 0.0002 ), serum creatinine (p = 0.001) and age (p = 0.003), but not gender. Conclusions We conclude that homocysteine may be a risk factor for retinal vascular disease and could be simply and cheaply treated with folate and vi tamins B-6 and B-12.