Screening for HIV infection in genitourinary medicine clinics: a lost opportunity?

Citation
C. Carne et al., Screening for HIV infection in genitourinary medicine clinics: a lost opportunity?, SEX TRANS I, 76(4), 2000, pp. 307-310
Citations number
11
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Clinical Immunolgy & Infectious Disease","da verificare
Journal title
SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
ISSN journal
1368-4973 → ACNP
Volume
76
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
307 - 310
Database
ISI
SICI code
1368-4973(200008)76:4<307:SFHIIG>2.0.ZU;2-#
Abstract
Objectives: To examine the policy and practice of HIV testing in genitourin ary medicine clinics in the United Kingdom. Design: All 176 consultants in charge of genitourinary medicine clinics in the United Kingdom were sent a policy and practice questionnaire. A self se lected group of 53 clinics conducted a retrospective case note survey of th e first 100 patients seen in each clinic in 1998. Setting: Genitourinary medicine clinics in the United Kingdom. Subjects: Consultants in charge of, and case notes of patients attending, g enitourinary medicine clinics. Interventions: None Main outcome measures: Number of patients tested for HIV. Results: Consultants' assessments of their rate of HIV testing often exceed ed the actual rates of testing in the clinic as a whole. The majority of pa tients deemed to be at high risk requested an HIV test. The exception were heterosexuals who had lived in sub-Saharan Africa. Among attenders at high risk of HIV who did not request a test, 57/196 (29%) were not offered one b y clinic staff. Two fifths (51/130) of consultants felt the proportion of p atients tested in their clinic was too low The commonest reason given for t his was a lack of time, especially that of health advisers. Conclusions: A substantial minority of people with HIV infection attending genitourinary medicine clinics fail to have their infection diagnosed. Two major reasons were identified. Firstly, a test was not always offered to th ose at high risk of HIV. Secondly, a lack of resources, mainly staff, which prevents some clinics from increasing their level of testing.