Stone movements and permeability changes in till caused by freezing and thawing

Citation
P. Viklander et D. Eigenbrod, Stone movements and permeability changes in till caused by freezing and thawing, COLD REG SC, 31(2), 2000, pp. 151-162
Citations number
25
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Civil Engineering
Journal title
COLD REGIONS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
ISSN journal
0165-232X → ACNP
Volume
31
Issue
2
Year of publication
2000
Pages
151 - 162
Database
ISI
SICI code
0165-232X(200007)31:2<151:SMAPCI>2.0.ZU;2-T
Abstract
Vertical uplifting of boulders and stones is well known to take place in co ld regions. Movements of stones in roads might lead to traffic danger, vehi cle failures, and cause breakdown of the road surface with the need of expa nsive repair as a consequence. In addition, freeze/thaw and associated ston e movements may cause an increase in permeability, which can lead to contam ination of soils and ground water if used as soil liners in landfill areas or even dam failures if used as hydraulic barriers in earth dams. Freeze/th aw tests were carried out in the laboratory on a silty sandy soil in order to study movements of embedded stones and to measure how the overall permea bility was influenced by freeze/thaw cycles. The soil samples were compacte d at three different water contents, i.e. 11.5% (optimum), 14.5%, and 17.5% . Each sample contained one stone, placed at a predetermined depth. The soi l samples were subjected to one-dimensional open system freeze/thaw. Soil t emperatures, volume changes, and stone movements were measured. The results showed that upward stone movements took place due to freeze/thaw in the fr ost susceptible soil compacted at and 3% above the optimum water content. I n addition, the permeability increased in samples with initial water conten ts of 11.5% and 14.5%. This permeability increase was as much as 81 times a fter six freeze/thaw cycles. For the samples with initial water contents of 17.5%, very small changes in permeability were measured. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.