Painting Mexican identities: Nationalism and gender in the work of Maria Izquierdo

Authors
Citation
Ra. Greeley, Painting Mexican identities: Nationalism and gender in the work of Maria Izquierdo, OX ART J, 23(1), 2000, pp. 51-72
Citations number
47
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Arts & Architecture
Journal title
OXFORD ART JOURNAL
ISSN journal
0142-6540 → ACNP
Volume
23
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Pages
51 - 72
Database
ISI
SICI code
0142-6540(2000)23:1<51:PMINAG>2.0.ZU;2-A
Abstract
The Mexican Muralists have been taken as virtually the sole artistic advoca tes of the Mexican Revolution, often to the neglect of the rich cultural dy namic of which they were an integral part. But in fact, the struggle to art iculate a revolutionary cultural identity in a society so heavily defined b y its colonialist history produced (and continues to do so) a widely varied set of responses to issue of Mexicanidad. The work and life of Maria Izqui erdo provide us with one such response. Izquierdo began her career under th e patronage of Diego Rivera, but soon allied herself with an avant-garde gr oup in opposition to the Muralists, the Contemporaneos, who challenged the latter on a number of levels. They proffered the work of Izquierdo in oppos ition to the Muralists as a representative of cultural nationalism 'beyond' politics and closer to the 'purity' of indigenous culture. The Contemporan eos' criticism of the Muralists also held a critique of the use of male dom inance and power as a structural framework for defining national identity. Izquierdo's paintings offer insight into how the painter's status as female proved crucial, as it intertwined with discourses on class and race, to th e construction of a nationalist discourse meant to undermine the Muralists' public image as socialist champions of Mexican workers and peasants.