Real-time single particle mass spectrometry: A historical review of a quarter century of the chemical analysis of aerosols

Citation
Ca. Noble et Ka. Prather, Real-time single particle mass spectrometry: A historical review of a quarter century of the chemical analysis of aerosols, MASS SPECTR, 19(4), 2000, pp. 248-274
Citations number
141
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Spectroscopy /Instrumentation/Analytical Sciences
Journal title
MASS SPECTROMETRY REVIEWS
ISSN journal
0277-7037 → ACNP
Volume
19
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
248 - 274
Database
ISI
SICI code
0277-7037(200007/08)19:4<248:RSPMSA>2.0.ZU;2-5
Abstract
Real-time single particle mass spectrometry; or continuous aerosol mass spe ctrometry was originally developed in the 1970s for the purpose of identify ing the chemical composition of airborne particulate matter in real-time. A lthough this technique has continued to evolve throughout the following dec ades, the fundamental characteristic of this method remains the same, invol ving the continuous introduction of solid particle ol liquid droplets direc tly into the ion source region of a mass spectrometer. Continuous sample in troduction allows for the chemical analysis of single airborne particles in real-time. A number of mass analyzers have been employed in real-time sing le particle mass spectromrtry: The original real-time single particle mass spectrometer used a magnetic sector mass analyzer. Quadrupole, double-focus ing, and ion tap mass spectrometers have also been utilized. The majority o f the current real-time single particle mass spectrometry techniques use ti me-of-flight mass spectrometry. In the literature, a variety of general nam es have been applied to real-time single particle mass spectrometry methods . These names include direct-inlet mass spectrometry, on-line microprobe ma ss spectrometry, particle analysis by mass spectrometry, particle beam mass spectrometry, and rapid-single particle mass spectrometry. This review cov ers real-time single particle mass spectrometry techniques that were develo ped from 1973 through 1998, specifically for analyzing airborne particulate matter, including environmental aerosols, biological aerosols, and clean-r oom aerosols. Because the majority of the historical and current real-time single particle mass spectrometers have been employed for atmospheric aeros ols, this topic is the primary focus of this review. This review does not i nclude on-line mass spectrometry methods that are employed as a detector fo r other instrumental methods, such as liquid chromatography. (C) 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.