Survey of nationally registered emergency medical services providers: Pediatric education

Citation
Pw. Glaeser et al., Survey of nationally registered emergency medical services providers: Pediatric education, ANN EMERG M, 36(1), 2000, pp. 33-38
Citations number
31
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Aneshtesia & Intensive Care
Journal title
ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
ISSN journal
0196-0644 → ACNP
Volume
36
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Pages
33 - 38
Database
ISI
SICI code
0196-0644(200007)36:1<33:SONREM>2.0.ZU;2-W
Abstract
Study objective: To survey emergency medical services (EMS) providers on a national level to determine and describe their perspective regarding their initial and continuing education (CE) needs in pediatrics. Methods: A 10-question survey was developed, pilot-tested, and sent to EMS providers as a part of their National Registry of Emergency Medical Technic ians reregistration materials. Results: Surveys were completed by 18,218 EMS providers, a response rate of 67%. During a typical month, 60% of emergency medical technician-paramedic s (EMT-Ps), 84% of EMT-intermediates (EMT-ls), and 87% of basic EMTs (EMT-B s) care for 0 to 3 pediatric patients. CE was identified by all provider le vels as the main source of their pediatric knowledge and skills. A state or national mandate for required CE in pediatrics was supported by 76% of sur veyed providers. More than 70% of all providers responded they were comfort able to some degree with their own ability and their EMS system's ability w hen confronted with a critical pediatric call. Cost, availability, and trav el distance were identified by all levels as the primary barriers to obtain ing pediatric CE. All levels identified infants as the age of greatest conc ern if the provider was called to manage a critical case. Conclusion: Surveyed practicing nationally registered EMS providers have in frequent contact with pediatric patients and have acquired mast of their pe diatric knowledge and skills from CE. In general, these providers are comfo rtable with their personal and their system's ability to care for children, but clearly support the need for required pediatric CE and identify the bi rth to 3-year age range as the priority for an educational focus. Cost, tra vel distance, and availability of pediatric CE are barriers that should be considered if pediatric CE is to be required of EMS providers.