Engaging women's interest in colorectal cancer screening: A public health strategy

Citation
W. Burke et al., Engaging women's interest in colorectal cancer screening: A public health strategy, J WOMEN H G, 9(4), 2000, pp. 363-371
Citations number
69
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Public Health & Health Care Science","General & Internal Medicine
Journal title
JOURNAL OF WOMENS HEALTH & GENDER-BASED MEDICINE
ISSN journal
1524-6094 → ACNP
Volume
9
Issue
4
Year of publication
2000
Pages
363 - 371
Database
ISI
SICI code
1524-6094(200005)9:4<363:EWIICC>2.0.ZU;2-3
Abstract
Screening rates for colorectal cancer are unacceptably low. New guidelines, public education campaigns, and expanded coverage of screening costs by he althcare insurance are expected to increase screening rates, but interventi ons targeting women may accelerate this change. Most American women already participate in regular cancer screening, in the form of Papanicolaou (Pap) tests and mammography, so they may be receptive to tailored messages about the need to add regular colorectal cancer screening to their preventive he alth regimen. In addition, their role in promoting the health of family mem bers may position women to influence screening behavior in family and frien ds. Women may be particularly valuable change agents in populations where s creening rates are traditionally low, such as medically underserved populat ions, the elderly or low socioeconomic status groups with competing health priorities, and populations with cultural values or practices inconsistent with the adoption of a new screening behavior. To serve as agents of change in their family and social networks, women must understand that colorectal cancer is not solely a man's disease and that the benefits of colorectal s creening are similar to those of Pap testing and mammography. Colorectal ca ncer screening should also be promoted within a framework of a lifelong str ategy for health maintenance for both men and women. The message to women s hould emphasize the value of colorectal cancer screening rather than the di sagreement among experts over preferred screening strategies and should emp hasize the value of shared decision making between the patient and her heal thcare provider.