Amphibians and reptiles of the Dominican Republic: species of special concern

Citation
R. Powell et al., Amphibians and reptiles of the Dominican Republic: species of special concern, ORYX, 34(2), 2000, pp. 118-128
Citations number
62
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Environment/Ecology
Journal title
ORYX
ISSN journal
0030-6053 → ACNP
Volume
34
Issue
2
Year of publication
2000
Pages
118 - 128
Database
ISI
SICI code
0030-6053(200004)34:2<118:AAROTD>2.0.ZU;2-0
Abstract
The Dominican Republic faces multiple threats to biodiversity. A list of na tive species of amphibians and reptiles (excluding sea turtles) is presente d. Some may have become extinct recently, substantial populations of others have been extirpated, some have greatly reduced numbers, and others appear to be rare or have restricted ranges. Most of the 13 taxa listed are relat ively large, vulnerable to human exploitation or introduced predators, and/ or have limited distributions and specific habitat requirements. To be list ed, evidence must exist that: (1) populations are dwindling, (2) the range is shrinking, or (3) a species must be vulnerable to exploitation and histo rically rare. Two iguanas (Cyclura cornuta, C. ricordii), two turtles (Trac hemys decorata, T. stejnegeri vicina), and one crocodilian (Crocodylus acut us) have been exploited extensively and have long been recognized as threat ened or endangered. The ranges of Cyclura ricordii and T. decorata are very localized and the previously widespread ranges of the others have shrunk o r become fragmented. A toad (Bufo fluviaticus), a large galliwasp (Celestus anelpistus), and a snake (Alsophis melanichnus) have not been collected re cently. Only a few specimens of another galliwasp (C. carraui) and a dwarf gecko (Sphaerodactylus cochranae) have been taken recently. In addition, ex tensive portions of the habitats of these species have been severely altere d. Three other snakes (Alsophis anomalus, Ialtris agyrtes, I. dorsalis) are rare and may never have been common. Their size and habits render them vul nerable to predation by the introduced mongoose and to decimation by humans who fear and dislike them.