Small scale aquaculture as a tool for oyster restoration in Chesapeake Bay

Citation
Rd. Brumbaugh et al., Small scale aquaculture as a tool for oyster restoration in Chesapeake Bay, MAR TECH SJ, 34(1), 2000, pp. 79-86
Citations number
33
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Civil Engineering
Journal title
MARINE TECHNOLOGY SOCIETY JOURNAL
ISSN journal
0025-3324 → ACNP
Volume
34
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Pages
79 - 86
Database
ISI
SICI code
0025-3324(200021)34:1<79:SSAAAT>2.0.ZU;2-C
Abstract
Since the early 1990s, efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay's devastated o yster stocks have focused on the construction of small (similar to 2 ha.) i ntertidal shell reefs designed to mimic historic 3-dimensional reef habitat . The reefs are managed as oyster sanctuaries to allow adult oysters to acc umulate, grow, and spawn over time. To enhance the effectiveness of this st rategy, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation initiated a program in 1997 to train students and volunteers to grow large numbers of hatchery-produced oysters for stocking sanctuary reefs in selected tributaries. In 1998, a significan t increase in spat settlement was documented in the Lynnhaven River, a smal l tributary where volunteer-grown oysters were transplanted onto a sanctuar y reef providing further direction for restoration efforts. Since then, the program has expanded to include more than 500 citizens and 120 school clas ses on a Bay wide scale. This paper describes the strategy for restoring oy sters in two small Virginia tributaries using volunteers, specifically midd le and high school students, to grow broodstock (i.e., reproductively matur e) oysters for transplanting onto state-managed sanctuary reefs using small -scale aquaculture techniques. To date, volunteers enlisted in a program du bbed the Chesapeake Bay Foundation "Oyster Corps" have grown and stocked mo re than 250,000 hatchery-produced oysters in Virginia's portion of Chesapea ke Bay. Small scale aquaculture techniques have provided a simple, yet effe ctive, means of involving the public in a restoration effort designed to in crease oysters by a factor of 10 by the year 2010.