Choosing what I want versus rejecting what I do not want: An application of decision framing to product option choice decisions

Citation
Cw. Park et al., Choosing what I want versus rejecting what I do not want: An application of decision framing to product option choice decisions, J MARKET C, 37(2), 2000, pp. 187-202
Citations number
27
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Economics
Journal title
JOURNAL OF MARKETING RESEARCH
ISSN journal
0022-2437 → ACNP
Volume
37
Issue
2
Year of publication
2000
Pages
187 - 202
Database
ISI
SICI code
0022-2437(200005)37:2<187:CWIWVR>2.0.ZU;2-0
Abstract
The authors examine the effects of using a subtractive versus an additive o ption-framing method on consumers' option choice decisions in three studies . The former option-framing method presents consumers with a fully loaded p roduct and asks them to delete options they do not want. The latter present s them with a base model and asks them to add the options they do want. Com bined, the studies support the managerial attractiveness of the subtractive versus the additive option-framing method. Consumers tend to choose more o ptions with a higher total option price when they use subtractive versus ad ditive option framing. This effect holds across different option price leve ls (Study 1) and product categories of varying price (Study 2). Moreover, t his effect is magnified when subjects are asked to anticipate regret from t heir option choice decisions (Study 2). However, option framing has a diffe rent effect on the purchase likelihood of the product category itself, depe nding on the subject's initial interest in buying within the category. Alth ough subtractive option framing offers strong advantages to managers when p roduct commitment is high, it appears to demotivate category purchase when product commitment is low (Study 3). In addition, the three studies reveal several other findings about the attractiveness of subtractive versus addit ive option framing from the standpoint of consumers and managers. These fin dings, in turn, offer interesting public policy and future research implica tions.