Signals and behavioural responses are not coupled in males: aggression affected by replacement of an evolutionarily lost colour signal

Citation
Vs. Quinn et Dk. Hews, Signals and behavioural responses are not coupled in males: aggression affected by replacement of an evolutionarily lost colour signal, P ROY SOC B, 267(1445), 2000, pp. 755-758
Citations number
29
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Experimental Biology
Journal title
PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON SERIES B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
ISSN journal
0962-8452 → ACNP
Volume
267
Issue
1445
Year of publication
2000
Pages
755 - 758
Database
ISI
SICI code
0962-8452(20000422)267:1445<755:SABRAN>2.0.ZU;2-E
Abstract
Male Sceloporus virgatus lack the blue abdominal patches which are used dur ing aggressive encounters in other Sceloporus lizards. Herein we report tha t, despite having lost this signal, males have retained a behavioural respo nse to experimentally restored blue abdominal patches. We tested two adapti ve hypotheses: selection acted primarily upon signallers or selection acted upon both signallers and receivers. The first predicts that only the signa l is lost and that male interactions should be affected by the restoration of blue patches. The latter predicts that both the signal and behavioural r esponse are lost and the display of the restored blue patches should have n o effect on male-male interactions. We compared the behaviour of receivers in paired encounters where one male (signaller) had blue-painted abdominal patches to a set of trials where both males had white-painted abdomens, unm anipulated abdomens or a novel-painted pattern. The receivers of the blue-p ainted signal were more likely to display submissive behaviour. The receive rs in either the unmanipulated, white-painted or novel-painted signal trial s were more likely to display neutral behaviour. These results support the hypothesis that receivers have retained a behavioural response and selectio n has acted primarily on the signaller. We believe this is the first docume ntation of males responding to an evolutionarily lost signal in conspecific males.