The ins and outs of DNA fingerprinting the infectious fungi

Authors
Citation
Dr. Soll, The ins and outs of DNA fingerprinting the infectious fungi, CLIN MICROB, 13(2), 2000, pp. 332
Citations number
429
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Microbiology
Journal title
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS
ISSN journal
0893-8512 → ACNP
Volume
13
Issue
2
Year of publication
2000
Database
ISI
SICI code
0893-8512(200004)13:2<332:TIAOOD>2.0.ZU;2-L
Abstract
DNA fingerprinting methods have evolved as major tools in fungal epidemiolo gy. However, no single method has emerged as the method of choice, and some methods perform better than others at different levels of resolution. In t his review, requirements for an effective DNA fingerprinting method are pro posed and procedures are described for testing the efficacy of a method. In light of the proposed requirements, the most common methods now being used to DNA fingerprint the infectious fungi are described and assessed. These methods include restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), RFLP with hybridization probes, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and other PCR-bas ed methods, electrophoretic karyotyping, and sequencing-based methods. Proc edures for computing similarity coefficients, generating phylogenetic trees , and testing the stability of clusters are then described. To facilitate t he analysis of DNA fingerprinting data, computer-assisted methods are descr ibed. Finally, the problems inherent in the collection of test and control isolates are considered, and DNA fingerprinting studies of strain maintenan ce during persistent or recurrent infections, microevolution in infecting s trains, and the origin of nosocomial infections are assessed in light of th e preceding discussion of the ins and outs of DNA fingerprinting. The inten t of this review is to generate an awareness of the need to verify the effi cacy of each DNA fingerprinting method for the level of genetic relatedness necessary to answer the epidemiological question posed, to use quantitativ e methods to analyze DNA fingerprint data, to use computer-assisted DNA fin gerprint analysis systems to analyze data, and to file data in a form that can be used in the future for retrospective and comparative studies.