Volumetric measurements of peripheral oedema in clinical conditions

Citation
F. Brijker et al., Volumetric measurements of peripheral oedema in clinical conditions, CLIN PHYSL, 20(1), 2000, pp. 56-61
Citations number
12
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
General & Internal Medicine",Physiology
Journal title
CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY
ISSN journal
0144-5979 → ACNP
Volume
20
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Pages
56 - 61
Database
ISI
SICI code
0144-5979(200001)20:1<56:VMOPOI>2.0.ZU;2-6
Abstract
Water-displacement volumetry can be used for quantifying the volume of the leg. However, not much is known about its application in patients with peri pheral oedema of cardiopulmonary origin. We measured the reproducibility of a water-displacement apparatus with a solid object and in ten non-oedemato us clinical patients (group A). The day-to-day variability of the leg volum e was assessed in the same group. The diurnal variability was assessed in t en patients with persisting peripheral oedema (group B). The effect of trea tment on the severity of peripheral oedema was evaluated in another nine pa tients with peripheral oedema, who were in need of diuretic treatment (grou p C). Volumetric results were compared to the ankle circumference method an d the body weight method. The coefficient of variation was 0.16% in the fix ed object and 0.47% in group A. The day-to-day variability was 1.52% after 1 day and 1.76% after a mean interval of 4.8 days. In group B, leg volume a nd circumference increased during the day (5.9%, P<0.001, and 24%, P<0.01, respectively), while body weight remained unchanged. In group C, leg volume , circumference and body weight decreased significantly after treatment (13 .1%, P<0.01, 71%, P<0.05, and 5.9%, P<0.05). The correlation between the ch anges in volume and body weight was poor (r = 0.37, P = 0.33). In conclusio n, (1) water-displacement volumetry is highly reproducible, (2) a diurnal v ariability of peripheral oedema was found, and (3) volumetry is a suitable tool for monitoring peripheral oedema, while the body weight method appears to be less accurate.