Respiratory syncytial virus genetic and antigenic diversity

Authors
Citation
Wm. Sullender, Respiratory syncytial virus genetic and antigenic diversity, CLIN MICROB, 13(1), 2000, pp. 1
Citations number
133
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Review
Categorie Soggetti
Microbiology
Journal title
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY REVIEWS
ISSN journal
0893-8512 → ACNP
Volume
13
Issue
1
Year of publication
2000
Database
ISI
SICI code
0893-8512(200001)13:1<1:RSVGAA>2.0.ZU;2-5
Abstract
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of viral lower respirato ry tract infections among infants and young children in both developing and developed countries. There are two major antigenic groups of RSV, A and B, and additional antigenic variability occurs within the groups. The most ex tensive antigenic and genetic diversity is found in the attachment glycopro tein, G. During individual epidemic periods, viruses of both antigenic grou ps may cocirculate or viruses of one group may predominate. When there are consecutive annual epidemics in which the same group predominates, the domi nant viruses are genetically different from year to year. The antigenic dif ferences that occur among these viruses may contribute to the ability of RS V to establish reinfections throughout life. The differences between the tw o groups have led to vaccine development strategies that should provide pro tection against both antigenic groups. The ability to discern intergroup an d intragroup differences has increased the power of epidemiologic investiga tions of RSV. Future studies should expand our understanding of the molecul ar evolution of RSV and continue to contribute to the process of vaccine de velopment.