Migration of virus-infected neuronal cells in cerebral slice cultures of developing mouse brains after in vitro infection with murine cytomegalovirus

Citation
Y. Shinmura et al., Migration of virus-infected neuronal cells in cerebral slice cultures of developing mouse brains after in vitro infection with murine cytomegalovirus, ACT NEUROP, 98(6), 1999, pp. 590-596
Citations number
41
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Neurosciences & Behavoir
Journal title
ACTA NEUROPATHOLOGICA
ISSN journal
0001-6322 → ACNP
Volume
98
Issue
6
Year of publication
1999
Pages
590 - 596
Database
ISI
SICI code
0001-6322(199912)98:6<590:MOVNCI>2.0.ZU;2-#
Abstract
To investigate the effect of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection on the developing mouse, brain in vitro, we developed an infection system using c erebral slice cultures. Using a micromanipulator, the cerebral slices from mouse embryos on day 18.5 of gestation were injected in the subventricular zone with recombinant MCMV in which the lacZ gene was inserted into a late gene, and were cultured for 7 days. Viral infection, detected by beta-galac tosidase reaction, was developed at the injection sites of the slices. The virus-infected spots in the slices were enhanced by adding tumor necrosis f actor-a to the medium and inhibited by adding phosphonoacetic acid or ganci clovir. Sections from paraffin-embedded slices were subjected to immunohist ochemical analyses. Neuronal cells, labeled with 5-brorno-2-deoxyuridine 24 h before cutting the slices, migrated to the cerebral cortex in the slices . Virus-infected neuronal cells expressing only the early viral antigen mig rated to the cortex, whereas glial cells expressing the immediate early and late antigens tended to remain at the injected sites. The neuronal migrati on of infected cells was not observed in the cerebral slices from 7-day-old mice and viral infection was not detected after injection in the cerebral slices from 14- and 21-day-old mice. These results from these cerebral slic es may reflect the infectious dynamics in vivo, and this system may provide a useful model for analysis of disorders of brain development caused by CM V.