Internal medicine clinical teaching unit: Is it an inappropriate site for student learning?

Citation
Pj. Mcleod et Tw. Meagher, Internal medicine clinical teaching unit: Is it an inappropriate site for student learning?, TEACH L MED, 11(4), 1999, pp. 192-195
Citations number
9
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
General & Internal Medicine
Journal title
TEACHING AND LEARNING IN MEDICINE
ISSN journal
1040-1334 → ACNP
Volume
11
Issue
4
Year of publication
1999
Pages
192 - 195
Database
ISI
SICI code
1040-1334(199923)11:4<192:IMCTUI>2.0.ZU;2-V
Abstract
Background: Internal medicine clinical clerkships usually emphasize student learning of hypothesis generation, problem solving, and patient management At our school we are concerned that clinical teaching unit (CTU)-based pat ient exposure is not fostering development of these skills. Purposes: We evaluated our clerks' interactions with patients on our CTUs t o document whether the timing of student exposure to patients is conducive to the acquisition of basic clinical skills. Methods: Once per week for 8 weeks, lye met with all internal medicine cler ks on the CTUs at our 4 teaching hospitals. Each student completed a questi onnaire related to each patient worked up in the previous week; We specific ally documented when the first interaction occurred with each patient. We a lso asked students for their perceptions of the learning experiences. Results: Clinical clerks usually first interact with their patients after i nitial data acquisition, hypothesis generation, and ordering of investigati ons and therapy have been completed by other physicians. Students perceive that meeting patients late in the hospitalization is educationally disadvan tageous. Conclusions: Our clinical clerks usually interact with their patients late in the hospitalization and are therefore deprived of the opportunity to dev elop the key clinical skills of hypothesis generation, problem-solving, and investigation and management of patients.