A magnetized black hole model of LS I+61 degrees 303

Authors
Citation
B. Punsly, A magnetized black hole model of LS I+61 degrees 303, ASTROPHYS J, 519(1), 1999, pp. 336-344
Citations number
35
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Space Sciences
Journal title
ASTROPHYSICAL JOURNAL
ISSN journal
0004-637X → ACNP
Volume
519
Issue
1
Year of publication
1999
Part
1
Pages
336 - 344
Database
ISI
SICI code
0004-637X(19990701)519:1<336:AMBHMO>2.0.ZU;2-P
Abstract
model of the nonthermal emission from the binary LS I +61 degrees 303 and t he coincident hard gamma-ray source 2EG J0241+6119 is presented that identi fies the compact companion with a magnetized black hole. The model describe s the gamma-ray spectrum from 100 keV to 30 GeV in terms of inverse Compton scattering in a relativistic black hole jet. Accordingly, it predicts sign ificant variability in the high-energy regime on timescales much shorter th an the orbital period las observed). The jet also powers quiescent X-ray (i nverse Compton) and radio emission (synchrotron) consistent with observatio n. At periastron, significant accretion necessarily occurs from the primary Be star to the compact companion. This periodic accretion is associated wi th the power source for periodic radio and X-ray flares observed in LS I +6 1 degrees 303. The accretion flow is shocked at the black hole magnetospher ic boundary producing hot plasma that synchrotron-cools in the strong magne tic field, creating X-rays (the X-ray flare). The hot gas also drives an ep isodic hydrodynamic wind that collides with the black hole-driven jet at di stances greater than 10(13) Cm from the hole. The resulting wind-jet intera ction creates synchrotron radio emission (the periodic radio flare). The mo del predicts that the peak of the X-ray flare precedes the peak of the radi o flare by approximate to 9 days (consistent with observation). It also pre dicts a size of the high-state radio emission consistent with VLBI measurem ents as well as a smaller angular size for the high-state emitting region a s compared to the region producing the quiescent radio emission. One final prediction of note is the lack of pulsations in both the radio and X-rays l as observed), which is a difficulty with identifying the compact object wit h a pulsar.