Hazards of smoking initiation among Asian American and non-Asian adolescents in California: A survival model analysis

Citation
Xg. Chen et Jb. Unger, Hazards of smoking initiation among Asian American and non-Asian adolescents in California: A survival model analysis, PREV MED, 28(6), 1999, pp. 589-599
Citations number
48
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
General & Internal Medicine
Journal title
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
ISSN journal
0091-7435 → ACNP
Volume
28
Issue
6
Year of publication
1999
Pages
589 - 599
Database
ISI
SICI code
0091-7435(199906)28:6<589:HOSIAA>2.0.ZU;2-X
Abstract
Background. Information about the risk of smoking initiation among whites, African Americans, and Latino Americans has provided an important informati on base for smoking prevention programs among adolescents from these ethnic backgrounds. Unfortunately, there is a lack of such information for Asian Americans, a fast-growing ethnic minority group with much internal diversit y. Method. This study used cross-sectional data from 20,482 subjects 12-17 yea rs of age, randomly sampled in California, to describe and compare the risk of smoking initiation for adolescents by age among Asian American and othe r non-Asian ethnic groups, using survival analysis. Computer-aided telephon e interview techniques were used in data collection. Result. The risk of early smoking initiation among Asian American adolescen ts is about a third of that of Caucasians. However, the risk among Asian Am ericans continues to increase throughout adolescence, while the same risk a mong Caucasians and African Americans plateaus around 14-15 years of age. S ignificant differences in the levels and patterns of smoking initiation amo ng Asian American subgroups were observed, with Chinese Americans showing t he lowest risk of smoking initiation and Filipino Americans the highest, Ja panese and Korean Americans being in-between. Conclusion. Asian American adolescents may be especially at risk of smoking initiation later in adolescence, even though they are at lower risk early in adolescence. Smoking prevention programs for Asian Americans should cont inue throughout adolescence and early adulthood. (C) 1999 American Health F oundation and Academic Press.