Placing the newborn on the maternal abdomen after delivery increases the volume and CD34(+) cell content in the umbilical cord blood collected: An old maneuver with new applications

Citation
D. Grisaru et al., Placing the newborn on the maternal abdomen after delivery increases the volume and CD34(+) cell content in the umbilical cord blood collected: An old maneuver with new applications, AM J OBST G, 180(5), 1999, pp. 1240-1243
Citations number
22
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Reproductive Medicine","da verificare
Journal title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
ISSN journal
0002-9378 → ACNP
Volume
180
Issue
5
Year of publication
1999
Pages
1240 - 1243
Database
ISI
SICI code
0002-9378(199905)180:5<1240:PTNOTM>2.0.ZU;2-G
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to increase the number of the progenitor cells i n umbilical cord blood collected for transplantation. STUDY DESIGN: We randomly assessed the effect of "upper" and "lower" positi ons of the newborn on the volume and progenitor cell (CD34(+)) content of t he umbilical cord blood collected from 49 healthy, vaginally delivered, ter m neonates. RESULTS: Twenty-two collections were performed in the "upper" and 27 in the "lower" position. The volume of umbilical cord blood obtained in the "uppe r' position was 108.1 +/- 19.1 mL compared with 42.6 +/- 19.5 mt in the "lo wer" position (P <.0001). Mononuclear cell separation revealed significantl y higher numbers of cells in umbilical cord blood obtained in the "upper" g roup (P<.01). Although the percentage of CD34+ cells was comparable, the ab solute number of CD34+ cells was significantly higher in the "upper" group because of the larger volume collected (P <.02). At 24 hours after delivery the hemoglobin levels were not significantly different between newborns of the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Placing the newborn on the maternal abdomen after delivery and before cord clamping may significantly increase the volume of umbilical co rd blood collected and therefore the CD34(+) counts that improve transplant ation success without placing the mother or the newborn at risk. (Am J Obst et Gynecol 1999;180:1240-3.).