Nest defence by Magpies (Pica pica) and the brood parasitic Great Spotted Cuckoos (Clamator glandarius) in parasitized and unparasitized nests

Citation
M. Soler et al., Nest defence by Magpies (Pica pica) and the brood parasitic Great Spotted Cuckoos (Clamator glandarius) in parasitized and unparasitized nests, J ORNITHOL, 140(2), 1999, pp. 199-205
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Animal Sciences
Journal title
JOURNAL FUR ORNITHOLOGIE
ISSN journal
0021-8375 → ACNP
Volume
140
Issue
2
Year of publication
1999
Pages
199 - 205
Database
ISI
SICI code
0021-8375(199904)140:2<199:NDBM(P>2.0.ZU;2-0
Abstract
Nest defence is a frequent and widespread parental behaviour which enhances brood survival. We have found that in a Spanish Magpie population which is heavily parasitized by the brood parasitic Great Spotted Cuckoo, Magpies d efend (1) unparasitized more frequently than parasitized nests, and (2) at the end of the nestling period more frequently than in other stages of the breeding cycle. Great Spotted Cuckoos are brood parasites, which means that their eggs are incubated and their nestlings are raised by members of a ho st species. Brood parasites are not thought to take care of their own offsp ring. However, we have found that Great Spotted Cuckoos sometimes scolded u s on our regular visits to parasitized magpie nests (but never on those to unparasitized nests). Frequency of nest defence by cuckoos differed signifi cantly among years, being significantly higher at the beginning of the stud y. Although sporadic observations of adult brood parasites feeding juvenile s have been recorded, nest defence has not previously been suggested for an y brood parasite.