A conventional beagle dog model for acute and chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori

Citation
G. Rossi et al., A conventional beagle dog model for acute and chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori, INFEC IMMUN, 67(6), 1999, pp. 3112-3120
Citations number
69
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Immunology
Journal title
INFECTION AND IMMUNITY
ISSN journal
0019-9567 → ACNP
Volume
67
Issue
6
Year of publication
1999
Pages
3112 - 3120
Database
ISI
SICI code
0019-9567(199906)67:6<3112:ACBDMF>2.0.ZU;2-J
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori has been widely recognized as an important human pathog en responsible for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer, and mu cose-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Little is known about the natural history of this infection since patients are usually recognized as having the infection only after years or decades of chronic disease. Severa l animal models of H. pylori infection, including those with different spec ies of rodents, nonhuman primates, and germ-free animals, have been develop ed. Here we describe a new animal model in,which the clinical, pathological , microbiological, and immunological aspects of human acute and chronic inf ection are mimicked and which allows us to monitor these aspects of infecti on within the same individuals. Conventional Beagle dogs were infected oral ly with a mouse-adapted strain of H. pylori and monitored for up to 24 week s. Acute infection caused vomiting and diarrhea. The acute phase was follow ed by polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, interleukin 8 induction, mononuc lear cell recruitment, and the appearance of a specific antibody response a gainst H. pylori. The chronic phase was characterized by gastritis, epithel ial. alterations, superficial erosions, and the appearance of the typical m acroscopic follicles that in humans are considered possible precursors of M ALT lymphoma. In conclusion, infection in this model mimics closely human i nfection and allows us to study those phases that cannot be studied in huma ns. This new model can be a unique tool for learning more about the disease and for developing strategies for treatment and prevention.