Jahaji Bhai: The emergence of a Dougla poetics in Trinidad and Tobago

Authors
Citation
R. Reddock, Jahaji Bhai: The emergence of a Dougla poetics in Trinidad and Tobago, IDENTITIES, 5(4), 1999, pp. 569-601
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Sociology & Antropology
Journal title
IDENTITIES-GLOBAL STUDIES IN CULTURE AND POWER
ISSN journal
1070-289X → ACNP
Volume
5
Issue
4
Year of publication
1999
Pages
569 - 601
Database
ISI
SICI code
1070-289X(199904)5:4<569:JBTEOA>2.0.ZU;2-9
Abstract
This paper explores the issues of ethnicity and identity in the postcolonia l Caribbean with special reference to Trinidad and Tobago, As with other mu lti-ethnic post-colonial societies, the collapse of post-World-War LT promi ses of unified national projects based on the nation-state or class politic s has seen the re-emergence of racial/ethnic based trajectories. In the con text of the contestations of ethnicity class, and gender in Trinidad and To bago, the voice of the "Dougla," or those projecting "dougla identities" of mired African and Indian ancestry, has been largely missing. Unlike in the North, conceptions of "mixed" identity have existed in the region for many decades. A concept of multiracial identity, however, is relatively new and underdeveloped. This paper explores tentative attempts through the popular culture to express such multiracial identities, especially through the med ium of Calypso and Soca and the contestations that greet such an emergence. The dynamics of the changing social, political, and cultural context are a lso taken into consideration. It does so through the contrasting 1996 "hits " of two singer/songwriters in the Calypso/Soca genre, Brother Marvin and C hris Garcia.