Mood as a predictor of disability and survival in patients newly diagnosedwith ALS MND

Citation
M. Johnston et al., Mood as a predictor of disability and survival in patients newly diagnosedwith ALS MND, BR J H PSYC, 4, 1999, pp. 127-136
Citations number
21
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Psycology
Journal title
BRITISH JOURNAL OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
ISSN journal
1359-107X → ACNP
Volume
4
Year of publication
1999
Part
2
Pages
127 - 136
Database
ISI
SICI code
1359-107X(199905)4:<127:MAAPOD>2.0.ZU;2-T
Abstract
Objectives. To investigate whether poor psychological status predicts short er survival faster progress of disease and greater disability in patients w ith ALS/MND (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neurone disease). Design. A prospective study of mood as a predictor of 6-month outcome in a consecutive cohort of patients with ALS/MND. Methods. A cohort of 38 consecutive patients completed mood, self-esteem we ll-being and disability measures at the time of diagnosis and 6 weeks later . Survival and disability were assessed at 6 months. Results. The 10 patients who died had poorer overall mood at the 6-week int erviews. Low mood early in disease also predicted greater disability at 6 m onths. The poor outcomes of patients with poor psychological well-being wer e not due to confounding associations between mood and disease severity Conclusions. The data confirm McDonald, Weidenfeld, Hillel, Carpenter & Wai ter's (1994) finding that poor psychological status predicts poor survival in ALS/MND. This study also extend their findings by (a) recruiting patient s at the point of diagnosis and therefore controlling for effects due to th e duration of disease, and (6) demonstrating that mood also predicts diseas e progression and disability The findings are unlikely to be due to simple spurious association of the psychological status measures with recognized i ndices of disease or of expected survival. Explanations for the results can be considered in the context of other findings of mood predicting outcomes of life-threatening disease and the possible value of psychological interv entions may be considered.