Residential status and risk of hip fracture

Citation
R. Norton et al., Residential status and risk of hip fracture, AGE AGEING, 28(2), 1999, pp. 135-139
Citations number
20
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
General & Internal Medicine
Journal title
AGE AND AGEING
ISSN journal
0002-0729 → ACNP
Volume
28
Issue
2
Year of publication
1999
Pages
135 - 139
Database
ISI
SICI code
0002-0729(199903)28:2<135:RSAROH>2.0.ZU;2-Q
Abstract
Objective: to examine the association between residential status and risk o f hip fracture in older people. Design: population-based case-control study. Setting: Auckland, New Zealand. Subjects: a random sample of all individuals greater than or equal to 60 ye ars, hospitalized with a fracture of the proximal femur between July 1991 a nd February 1994. Controls were age and gender frequency-matched to the cas es, randomly selected from a random sample of general practitioners. Main outcome measures: radiographically-confirmed fracture of the proximal femur. Fractures sustained as a result of major trauma, such as in a motor vehicle crash, and those associated with pre-existing pathological conditio ns were excluded. Results: individuals living in institutions were almost four times more Lik ely to sustain a hip fracture [age- and gender-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3 .8; 95% confidence interval (CT): 3.0-4.8] than those living in private hom es. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the risk of hip fra cture associated with living in an institution remained significantly incre ased (P < 0.0001), although the magnitude of the risk was somewhat diminish ed (OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.5-3.5). Conclusions: living in an institution is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in older people. Specific factors that place these individu als at increased risk need to be identified, in order to develop interventi on strategies.