ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION AND MICRONUTRIENT INTAKE AS RISK-FACTORS FOR LIVER-CIRRHOSIS - A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

Citation
G. Corrao et al., ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION AND MICRONUTRIENT INTAKE AS RISK-FACTORS FOR LIVER-CIRRHOSIS - A CASE-CONTROL STUDY, Annals of epidemiology, 8(3), 1998, pp. 154-159
Citations number
50
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Public, Environmental & Occupation Heath
Journal title
ISSN journal
1047-2797
Volume
8
Issue
3
Year of publication
1998
Pages
154 - 159
Database
ISI
SICI code
1047-2797(1998)8:3<154:AAMIAR>2.0.ZU;2-3
Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of a lcohol consumption and intake of 15 selected micronutrients with risk of liver cirrhosis. METHODS: Data from a case-control study performed in 1989-1990 in central Italy involving 115 incident cases and 167 hos pital controls were used. RESULTS: Cases and controls did not differ f or mean daily intake of calories, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Significant direct dose-response relationships between the intakes of vitamin A and iron and the risk cirrhosis were observed, while signif icant protective effects of nutrients and alcohol were also observed. The intakes of vitamin A and iron were significantly associated with t he risk of cirrhosis in lifetime teetotalers (odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 33.6 (1.2-979.9) and 37.9 (1.8-819.4) fo r higher intake of vitamin A and iron, respectively) and in consumers of <50 g/day of alcohol (vitamin A: OR 45.0; 95% CI, (2.6-774.6); iron : OR, 73.6; 95% CI, 4.3-999). The OR associated with intakes of vitami ns B-2 (riboflavin) and B-12 were not significant for the first two ca tegories of alcohol use, while a higher intake of these two vitamins r educed the risk of cirrhosis associated with alcohol consumption above 50 g/day; the ORs (95% CI) were 23.0 (2.7-198.9) and 14.0-999, respec tively, for higher and lower intake of vitamin B-12. CONCLUSION: These findings might explain at least a portion of the individual susceptib ility to alcohol-induced damage. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Inc.