EPIDEMIOLOGY OF RENAL-CELL CARCINOMA

Citation
A. Tavani et C. Lavecchia, EPIDEMIOLOGY OF RENAL-CELL CARCINOMA, JN. Journal of nephrology, 10(2), 1997, pp. 93-106
Citations number
68
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Urology & Nephrology
Journal title
ISSN journal
1121-8428
Volume
10
Issue
2
Year of publication
1997
Pages
93 - 106
Database
ISI
SICI code
1121-8428(1997)10:2<93:EORC>2.0.ZU;2-X
Abstract
Renal-cell cancer is responsible for about 2% of all cancer deaths in developed countries and represents 80-85% of all tumors of the kidney. Its etiology is still largely undefined. Recently the results of a la rge international population-based case-control study (International R enal-Cell Cancer Study), conducted between 1989 and 1991 In Australia, Denmark, Germany, Sweden and USA, including 1732 cases and 2309 contr ols, showed an increased risk of renal-cell cancer in relation to toba cco smoking, elevated body mass index, a few medical conditions, the u se of beta-blockers, a family history of the disease, high intake of d airy products and low intake of fruit and vegetables and, in women, mu ltiparity. Most other studies agree about a causal role of cigarette s moking in the etiology of renal-cell cancer, although its association is less strong than for several other tobacco-related neoplasms, with a relative risk of about 2 for current smokers. Other established risk factors are elevated body mass index (mainly in women) and a family h istory of the disease. Occupational exposure to chemicals appears to h ave little significance, although associations with specific products, such as asbestos fibres, have been reported. Some relationship has be en observed between renal-cell cancer and hypertension, use of anti-hy pertensives and kidney diseases, although this issue remains open to d iscussion. Data are inconsistent on the role of nutrition, mainly for fats and proteins, while vegetable and fruit consumption seems to conv ey some protection on renal-cell cancer risk. The risk of renal-cell c ancer was not materially elevated in relation to coffee, tea and alcoh ol intake and, in women, oral contraceptive use, hormone replacement t herapy, and menstrual factors.