TWITCHING AND QUIVERING OF THE TENTACLES DURING SNAIL OLFACTORY ORIENTATION

Authors
Citation
M. Lemaire et R. Chase, TWITCHING AND QUIVERING OF THE TENTACLES DURING SNAIL OLFACTORY ORIENTATION, Journal of comparative physiology. A, Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, 182(1), 1998, pp. 81-87
Citations number
19
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Physiology,Neurosciences,"Behavioral Sciences",Zoology
ISSN journal
0340-7594
Volume
182
Issue
1
Year of publication
1998
Pages
81 - 87
Database
ISI
SICI code
0340-7594(1998)182:1<81:TAQOTT>2.0.ZU;2-J
Abstract
In Helix aspersa the posterior tentacles house a sensitive olfactory o rgan. We studied two types of tentacular movements, twitch and quiver. A twitch is a brief retraction (mean duration, 4.1 s); a quiver is a rapid lateral movement (350 ms) unaccompanied by retraction. We videot aped the tentacles while snails explored an open field. When an attrac tive odor source, linalool, was present at one side of the arena, the snails consistently moved towards it. By contrast, if only the carrier substance was present the snails moved in random directions. Twitchin g was 50 times more frequent during linalool trials than during contro l trials, while quivering was 1.4 times more frequent. Twitching incre ased steadily and dramatically as snails approached the linalool sourc e and, in the temporal dimension, the maximum rate of-twitching occurr ed when the snails arrived at the odor source. Quivers occurred at a f airly constant rate. Twitching is interpreted as a mechanism to remove odor molecules trapped in the liquid covering of the olfactory epithe lium, thus resulting in better temporal resolution for olfactory perce ption. Quivering may be a mechanism to increase access of odor molecul es to receptors by decreasing the boundary layer at the surface of the tentacle.