EFFECT OF HIGH-FAT, HIGH-PROTEIN, AND HIGH-CARBOHYDRATE MEALS ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF A SMALL DOSE OF ETHANOL

Citation
Aw. Jones et al., EFFECT OF HIGH-FAT, HIGH-PROTEIN, AND HIGH-CARBOHYDRATE MEALS ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF A SMALL DOSE OF ETHANOL, British journal of clinical pharmacology, 44(6), 1997, pp. 521-526
Citations number
30
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
ISSN journal
0306-5251
Volume
44
Issue
6
Year of publication
1997
Pages
521 - 526
Database
ISI
SICI code
0306-5251(1997)44:6<521:EOHHAH>2.0.ZU;2-V
Abstract
Aims To investigate whether the relative amounts of fat, carbohydrate (CHO), or protein in a meal influence the pharmacokinetics of a small dose of ethanol.Methods Nine healthy men received ethanol (0.30 g kg(- 1) body weight) on five occasions in a randomized cross-over fashion. On three occasions the dose of ethanol was consumed within 15 min of e ating; a standardized breakfast of similar volume and calorific value but containing different amounts of fat, CHO, and protein. On two othe r occasions the same dose of ethanol was ingested on an empty stomach (overnight fast) or administered by intravenous (i.v.) infusion over 3 0 min. Results The blood-ethanol profiles showed large inter and intra individual variations, especially when ethanol was ingested after eati ng food. The peak blood-alcohol concentrations (BAC) were 16.6+/-4.0, 17.7+/-7.1, and 13.3+/-4.0 mg dl(-1) (mean+/-s.d.) after fat, CHO, and protein-rich meals and 30.8+/-4.3 and 54.3+/-6.4 mg dl(-1) after fast ing and i.v. infusion, respectively. The corresponding areas under the concentration-time profiles (AUG) were 1767+/-549, 1619+/-760, 1270+/ -406 mg dl(-1) min after fat, CHO, and protein-rich meals compared wit h 3210+/-527 and 4786+/-446 mg dl(-1) after fasting and i.v. infusion, respectively. The time required to eliminate ethanol from the blood w as shortened by 1-2 h in the fed-state. Conclusions Drinking ethanol a fter eating a meal, regardless of the nutritional composition, decreas es the systemic availability of ethanol. Because gastric emptying is s low and more prolonged with food in the stomach, the delivery of ethan ol to the duodenum and the liver will be highly variable as will the h epatic clearance of ethanol. Provided that portal venous BAC remains f airly low and ethanol metabolizing enzymes are not fully saturated the n part of the dose of ethanol can be cleared by hepatic first-pass met abolism (FPM), as orle consequence of Michaelis-Menten elimination kin etics.