Temperature monitoring practices during regional anesthesia

Citation
Sm. Frank et al., Temperature monitoring practices during regional anesthesia, ANESTH ANAL, 88(2), 1999, pp. 373-377
Citations number
29
Language
INGLESE
art.tipo
Article
Categorie Soggetti
Aneshtesia & Intensive Care","Medical Research Diagnosis & Treatment
Journal title
ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA
ISSN journal
0003-2999 → ACNP
Volume
88
Issue
2
Year of publication
1999
Pages
373 - 377
Database
ISI
SICI code
0003-2999(199902)88:2<373:TMPDRA>2.0.ZU;2-S
Abstract
Monitoring and maintaining body temperature during the perioperative period has a significant impact on the risk of myocardial ischemia, cardiac morbi dity, wound infection, surgical bleeding, and patient discomfort. To test t he hypothesis that body temperature is inadequately monitored during region al anesthesia (RA), we randomly surveyed 60 practicing anesthesiologists to determine practice patterns for temperature monitoring. Only 33% of the cl inicians surveyed routinely monitor body temperature during RA. Although sk in temperature monitoring has limitations, it was the most commonly used me thod among the survey respondents. When temperature is monitored during RA, most clinicians use either liquid crystal skin-surface monitoring or axill ary temperature probes. Of those surveyed, <15% use acceptable core tempera ture monitoring techniques (urinary bladder or tympanic membrane). In concl usion, it seems that body temperature is often not monitored in patients re ceiving RA. Implications: The results of this survey of practicing anesthes iologists indicate that body temperature is often not monitored in patients receiving regional anesthesia. It is therefore Likely that significant hyp othermia goes undetected and untreated in these patients.